Natural History Museum is branded sexist… for not having enough female animal exhibits

A piece published on the website of Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them), the political party of which I’m the chairman, in October 2019:

The madness continues. Our thanks to Mike P and Danuta for this. The end of the article:

Study author Dr Natalie Cooper, a blithering idiot employed at taxpayers’ expense at the Natural History Museum, said: ‘There is a tendency for the people collecting to want to get the largest grizzly bear or the animal with the most impressive horns.’

The animals were collected between 1751 and 2018, but things didn’t get better with time. Dr Cooper said: ‘Interestingly, we see no improvement. Even recent collections are biased.’

We may have added a few words there, but they’re implied.

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Dial 999 if you feel threatened by a man wolf-whistling at you in the street, says Alison Hernandez, police commissioner, Devon and Cornwall

A piece published on the website of Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them), the political party of which I’m the chairman, in October 2019:

Our thanks to Mike P for this. The start of the piece:

Women who are wolf-whistled in the street should report it to police, a crime commissioner has urged.

Devon and Cornwall commissioner Alison Hernandez said: ‘We are a bit clueless about the level of the problem.

She spoke after a young woman told her she was surprised to be told she could call 999 if she felt threatened.

Devon and Cornwall Police said it treated ‘sex or gender-based hate crimes or incidents seriously’.

Such offences included ‘misogynistic acts such as wolf-whistling or catcalling’, the force said, and it encouraged people to report them.

Only misandrous feminists (but I repeat myself) could consider wolf-whistling misogynistic.

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Paula Sherriff (L, Dewsbury) v Boris Johnson. How was that always going to go?

A piece published on the website of Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them), the political party of which I’m the chairman, in October 2019:

At the 2016 International Men’s Day debate in the chamber of the House of Commons, the second such event hosted by Philip Davies, I was with Natty and Raymond in the public gallery. One of the pleasures of the debate (video, 1:22:42) was to watch Paula Sherriff (L, Dewsbury), then a Shadow Minister for Wimmin & Equalities, name our Feminist of the Month awards, thereby putting them in Hansard for the first time, and winning a Lying Feminist of the Month award for a claim she made in her diatribe (1:08:29 – 1:11:03).

Scrolling forward to 25.9.19, you’ll surely enjoy this piece (video, 2:47) on The Guardian website. After enduring Ms Sherriff’s tirade, delivered with rather unattractive frowning and nose flaring, Boris Johnson responded with this:

I have to say, Mr Speaker, I’ve never heard such humbug in all my life.

A good point, well made, we think.

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Masculine culture is damaging your business – here’s how and why you should change it

A piece published on the website of Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them), the political party of which I’m the chairman, in October 2019:

A huge steaming pile of bullshit from Business Matters, which bills itself as “UKs leading business magazine”. The piece is so utterly woeful that the writer isn’t named, presumably to stop her becoming an object of ridicule.

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Another reason fat women (but not fat men) should lose weight

Our thanks to Elizabeth Hobson for this piece by Meredith Bennett-Smith for Huffpo:

Male Jurors More Likely To Find Fat Women Guilty, Study Says

Researchers at the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity have found the presence of a significant fat bias against female defendants in the courtroom, according to a recent study published in the International Journal of Obesity.

Yale psychologists created a mock jury scenario involving 471 study participants of various weights, according to the abstract of the study. While reviewing “a vignette describing a case of check fraud,” the jurors evaluated images of one of four alleged defendants: a lean male, a lean female, an obese male or an obese female. After looking at the shots, the participants were asked to rate how guilty they thought the defendant was on a 5-point Likert scale.

The results (via a Yale news release):

Male participants rated the obese female defendant guiltier than the lean female defendant, whereas female respondents judged the two female defendants equally regardless of weight. Among all participants, there were no differences in assessment of guilt between the obese male and lean male defendants.

“It’s important to look at weight stigma not only as a public health priority but also as a source of sweeping social injustice,” Schvey told Reuters.

While not particularly encouraging, Live Science notes that discrimination based on body mass index (BMI) has been documented before.

In 2011, researcher Alexandra Brewis, an anthropologist at Arizona State University, told the site that “moralizing ideas about what it means to be fat seem to have spread very quickly … It’s this moral judgment that creates prejudice and discrimination.”

Furthermore, in 2008, a different study found that men were more likely to be accepting of weight-based discrimination, according to Live Science.

Slate’s Katy Waldman hypothesized that there could be several related reasons for the revealed bias:

Perhaps we lean men suspect that larger women, given their history of stigmatization by people like us, are generally unhappier with their lot in life and thus more likely to engage in deviant behavior.

Perhaps we lean men are especially susceptible to the proven bias jurors hold toward physically attractive defendants (one that, it’s worth noting, declines when we engage in simulated deliberation, aka use our brains to assess the facts of a case).

In order to help alleviate the bias, the study suggests “voir dire and juror screening questionnaires,” the American Bar Association Journal notes, adding that “judicial instruction” may also be part of the solution.

The study, entitled “The influence of a defendant’s body weight on perceptions of guilt” was published Jan. 8.

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