After the high, the low: no women opt to fly Indian Air Force’s fighter planes

A piece published on the website of Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them), the political party of which I’m the chairman, in September 2016:

Predictable. It presumably cost the same to train the female pilots as their male colleagues, but they were not as willing to dedicate themselves to the most demanding and risky option – flying fighter planes – after their graduations.

There are parallels in the UK, of course. Let’s take female doctors. On average, female graduates from medical schools later work only half the hours over their medical careers, compared with male doctors. Women decline to work unsocial hours, or to work in the most demanding and risky fields, such as A&E – whether or not they have children.

Wherever we look, in the workplace and elsewhere, women as a class are reliably less work-centred and more risk-averse than men as a class. The state remains relentlessly in denial of this stark reality, with predictable consequences e.g. the NHS, which has been for 40+ years a job creation scheme for women wishing to work part-time. Over that time it’s become ever more inefficient and dysfunctional, ever more costly to taxpayers. No amount of money can fix what is clearly an irrecoverably broken model.

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