Dame Margaret Hodge: I can’t wait to work into my 80s

A piece published on the website of Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them), the political party of which I’m the chairman, in September 2018:

More feminist claptrap from the FT, since 2005 edited by one of the worst manginas in the mainstream media, Lionel Barber.

Margaret Hodge’s quote, “I can’t wait to work into my 80s” comes from the FT “Women at the Top” conference, one of those pathetic self-congratulatory events intended to “inspire” and “celebrate” women, with the futile objective of persuading women to do what they’ve been showing for decades they manifestly don’t want to do i.e. become the lifelong workhorses men have always been. Why don’t most women want that? Because most have the option of not doing so, invariably funded by men as partners and/or taxpayers. An extract from the silly article, emphases ours:

Joining her on stage for the FT discussion was Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice at London Business School. Starting from the evidence that we are living longer and are physically more capable in later life, the speakers pointed to the stimulation and structure that work brings at any age, while acknowledging the challenges created by working longer. The employment rate of women aged 50-64 is rising, but remains below that of men, at 67.5 per cent versus 76.2 per cent. This gap is partly explained by women’s role in caring for children and other family members, a point raised by Dame Margaret. She said that changing the culture and trying to “get men to be equally responsible is a really tough challenge”. 

[J4MB: I never tire of quoting punk songstress Toyah Wilcox’s refrain, “It’s a mystery, oh, it’s a mystery”. So, why is it a “really tough challenge”? Maybe – this will sound crazy, but let me throw it out there – because most men and women are content with traditional gender roles? Because they work, and make people happy, and are good for children, which feminist demands for gender roles never do? I find myself guilty of thoughtcrime. Take me away, officer. I self-identify as a woman as of this moment, so I look forward to a spell in one of those nice wimmin’s centres. Please provide at least one Gwyneth Paltrow vagina egg. I know my rights, as a woman…].

Another is the challenge of providing for a comfortable retirement. Gold-plated final-salary pension plans are disappearing as costs rise for companies. Employee benefits advice provider JLT found that only 11 FTSE 250 companies offered defined benefit pension plans to a significant number of employees.

Furthermore, the Women and Equalities Committee found the gender pay gap to be particularly pronounced for women over 40, [J4MB: The gender pay gap below 40 is in women’s favour, so how it can be “particularly pronounced for women over 40” is one of the great mysteries of our age] meaning that they earn less and subsequently have smaller pensions, a further challenge of working into later life. [J4MB: This totally ignores women’s preference for part-time over full-time work, their tendency to put less of their income into pensions because almost all their disposable income is spent on sanitary products (or is it shoes and handbags and vagina eggs? It’s so difficult to keep up with the latest research from the Gender Studies department at Leighton Buzzard University.]

Only three comments on the piece at the moment, this from Eddie:

Margaret Hodge helped get rid of decent pensions when she was part of Tony Blair’s cabinet. She also helped kill a lot of Iraqis. Who knows what she can do with another decade of hard work.

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