Femalefedupwithfeminism: Britain’s first specialist engineering university will take female school-leavers without A-level maths or physics to boost the number of female students. What could possibly go wrong?

A piece published on the website of Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them), the political party of which I’m the chairman, in April 2018:

Our thanks to Femafedupwithfeminism for this tweet. Over decades few female sixth form students have wanted to become engineers, despite tend of millions of pounds having been spent to “encourage” (in plain English, bribe with grants not available to male sixth form students) so feminists have come up with a creative “solution” to the intractable “problem”.

Women will shortly be able to get a pretend degree in engineering, and become pretend engineers. Presumably taxpayers will fund a pretend engineering workplace, where the women will design pretend buildings, bridges, planes etc. They’ll be asked to hand it their work at the end of each day, they’ll be told their work is amazing, and the papers can then be shredded, lest anyone actually start to build their nightmares – bridges made of ice cream, planes made of leaves, that sort of thing.

piece by Nicola Woolcock, Education Correspondent of The Times, in yesterday’s edition – honestly, not April 1, April Fools’ Day – emphases ours:

Britain’s first specialist engineering university will take school-leavers without A-level maths or physics to boost the number of female students.

The first provost of the New Model in Technology and Engineering (NMITE), which is due to open in Hereford in 2020, said that she was determined to increase the number of women taking the subject.

Britain has the lowest percentage of female engineers in Europe, according to the Women’s Engineering Society. Last year only 15 per cent of engineering undergraduates were women and they formed 11 per cent of engineers in work.

Elena Rodriguez-Falcon, 46, the university’s provost and chief academic officer, said that she would welcome students with three arts A levels. [J4MB: She’s set the bar way too high. Why not one GCSE in anything?] She said that Britain was the only country to insist that engineering students had maths and physics qualifications. School-leavers with strong GCSEs in maths and science and A levels in any subject could apply to NMITE. [J4MB: Why, in the name of all that is holy, might they want to do that?]

Its students will be called “learners” because there will be no lectures, studying or traditional exams and they will not graduate with an honours degree. Nor will they specialise in a particular type of engineering, such as mechanical or electrical. Instead they will work [J4MB: What will this “work” entail? Colouring in real engineers’ technical drawings?] on real projects in groups of five, [J4MB: Ah, it’s a social club for women who want to be pretend engineers] for nearly a month at a time, and build up a portfolio proving their skills, leaving with a pass or fail in a masters degree. [J4MB: We doubt whether they pass or fail will make any difference to these women’s employability.]

The university aims to produce engineers ready to start work [J4MB: Yet again, you couldn’t make this s*** up] rather than engineering graduates who then need to spend time training in industry.

A pilot group will start next autumn, followed by a full cohort of 350 in 2020. At present the institution is being designed and built from scratch. [J4MB: Scratch is going to be a popular choice of material for these women. They’ve heard that lots of cars, buildings, bridges etc. are built from scratch.]

Professor Rodriguez-Falcon, who was previously professor of enterprise and engineering education at the University of Sheffield, said: “Not enough young women study physics or maths, or if they do they choose to do degrees in other subjects such as medicine, because of the perception of our profession. [J4MB: Mainly the perception that you need to be numerate, and be prepared to work hard.] Removing these entry requirements is a quick win.

“The reality is that the maths and physics required during training can be tailored to our course.” {Ah, OK. Pretend maths and physics, So much easier to learn.]

The professor, who is from Mexico, said that she found it peculiar when she came to Britain 20 years ago that people sent to fix televisions and washing machines were called engineers. She said: “There is nothing wrong with the job they are doing but they are not engineers. It follows that parents then think of engineering as mechanics rather than professionals.”

She told Times Higher Education magazine: “I want to change engineering education, with integrity and with bucketloads of passion.” [J4MB: Integrity? She could be a comedienne on the BBC.]

She described NMITE as a “pioneering establishment that will change engineering tuition in the UK and, hopefully, the world for the better”. She said: “Recruiting more women into engineering will be vital to fill the shortage of UK engineers. [J4MB: The “shortage” of UK pretend engineer, certainly.] We have to accept [J4MB: …is that young women don’t want to become engineers?] that the efforts that we have made so far have not been enough to dramatically change the number of women entering engineering disciplines.”

The professor said that the goal was to have a gender balance and that taking away the requirement to have maths and physics A levels could help to attract talented female candidates to engineering.

She added: “This will help, no doubt, but we truly need to raise awareness of what engineering is with students’ main influencers, their parents. It is too late to do this once children are at school.” Asked about the biggest misconception about engineering, she said: “That it is a dirty discipline and that it is just for men. Both wrong.”

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