Women lose appeal over pension age increase

At last the absurd and laughable claim that women should be compensated for finally having equality with men with respect to the pension age, after decades of retiring five years earlier than men despite living longer, has been quashed.

Comrade Jeremy Corbyn was so desperate for power before the 2019 general election that he committed to compensate the women to the tune of £50+ BILLION, a bill that would mostly be paid by men, who have long been discriminated against with respect to  retirement age.

A piece in today’s Times:

Millions of women who were forced to work longer after their state pension age was raised cannot claim compensation after senior judges ruled that they did not suffer discrimination.

The Court of Appeal unanimously dismissed a claim brought by two women who argued that the government’s reform, which raised the state pension age for nearly four million women from 60 to 66, was discriminatory on the grounds of age and sex.

Julie Delve, 62, and Karen Glynn, 63, who were supported by the campaign group BackTo60, brought the challenge after losing a landmark High Court fight against the Department for Work and Pensions last year.

The women argued that raising their pension age unlawfully discriminated against them and that they were not given adequate notice of the changes.

However in a judgment published yesterday, Sir Terence Etherton, the Master of the Rolls and the most senior civil law judge in England and Wales, Lord Justice Underhill and Lady Justice Rose unanimously dismissed the claim. The appeal judges found that introducing the same state pension age for men and women did not amount to unlawful discrimination under EU or human rights laws.

The senior justices said that “despite the sympathy that we . . . feel for the appellants and other women in their position, we are satisfied that this is not a case where the court can interfere with the decisions taken through the parliamentary process”.

Joanne Welch, founder of the BackTo60 campaign, described the decision as “unconscionable” and said that the group’s legal team was “actively looking” at seeking leave to appeal the judgment to the Supreme Court.

Christina McAnea, the assistant general secretary at the union Unison, said the ruling was “nothing short of a disaster” for “a generation of women”.

The government welcomed the ruling. “Both the High Court and Court of Appeal have supported the actions of the DWP, under successive governments dating back to 1995, finding we acted entirely lawfully and did not discriminate on any grounds,” a Whitehall official said. “The government decided 25 years ago that it was going to make the state pension age the same for men and women as a long-overdue move towards gender equality.”

The comments stream is nearly 100% supportive of the legal ruling.

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